Learning

Autism

Autism is a term used for a number of developmental disabilities called Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD). It is a neurobiological disorder that affects how the person perceives and interprets their world, particularly the social environment. Experts believe that Autism presents itself during the first three years of a person's life. Being a wide- spectrum disorder means that no two people with autism will have exactly the same symptoms. As well as experiencing varying combinations of symptoms,…

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Cerebral Palsy

Cerebral palsy (CP) is a disorder that affects muscle tone, movement, and motor skills (the ability to move in a coordinated and purposeful way). CP is usually caused by brain damage that occurs before or during a child's birth, or during the first 3 to 5 years of a child's life. The brain damage that leads to cerebral palsy can also lead to other health issues, including vision, hearing, and speech problems, and learning disabilities. There is no cure for CP, but treatment, therapy, special…

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Childhood Apraxia of Speech (CAS)

Childhood apraxia of speech (CAS) is an uncommon speech disorder in which a child has difficulty making accurate movements when speaking. It's important to know that CAS is just a label for a speech disorder. To speak correctly, your child's brain has to learn how to make plans that tell his or her speech muscles how to move the lips, jaw and tongue in ways that result in accurate sounds and words. Your child's brain also plans these movements so that he or she speaks with normal speed and…

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Down Syndrome

In every cell in the human body, there is a nucleus, where genetic material is stored in genes. Genes carry the codes responsible for all of our inherited traits and are grouped along rod-like structures called chromosomes. Typically, the nucleus of each cell contains 23 pairs of chromosomes, half of which are inherited from each parent. Down syndrome occurs when an individual has a full or partial extra copy of chromosome 21. This additional genetic material alters the course of development and…

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Dyslexia

According to the U.S. National Institute of Health, dyslexia is a learning disability that can hinder a person's ability to read, write, spell and sometimes speak. It is one of a group of conditions known as learning disabilities. Dyslexia is the most common learning disability in children and persists throughout life. The severity of dyslexia can vary from mild to severe. The sooner dyslexia is treated, the more favourable the outcome; however, it is never too late for people with dyslexia to…

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Rett Syndrome

Rett syndrome is a rare, severe, "girls only" form of autism. It's usually discovered in the first two years of life, and a child's diagnosis with Rett syndrome can feel overwhelming. Although there's no cure, early identification and treatment may help girls and families who are affected by Rett syndrome. Although it's not always detected, a slowing of head growth is one of the first events in Rett syndrome. Loss of muscle tone is also an initial symptom. Soon, the little girl loses any…

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